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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon found in the catalog.

Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon

C. T. Dyrness

Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon

by C. T. Dyrness

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest forest and Range Experiment Station in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest fires -- Oregon.,
  • Soil moisture -- Measurement.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementC. T. Dyrness
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper PNW -- 202
    ContributionsPacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18 p. :
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13600979M

    The effects of fire on soil microbes is dependent to a large extent upon fire intensity. The responses of soil microbes to fires range from no detectable effect in low intensity fires to total sterilization of the surface layers of soil in very hot wildfires (see Joergensen and Hodges ; and Renbuss et al. ). It is not well understood if wildfires induce soil water repellency in broadleaf deciduous forests, such as those endemic to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the eastern United States. In , widespread wildfires provided an opportunity to study soil water repellency in this region. We selected sites in four locations with low to moderate burn severities, along with unburned controls. We.

    Effects of Wildfire on Vegetation Risk to vegetation will depend on the fire regime as well as the characteristics of the plants and trees exposed to a particular fire. The likelihood of a plant being killed by fire depends on a combination of time and temperature. et al. ). Following a late summer wildfire in the Oregon Cascade mountains, however, repel-lency of volcanic ash soils did not return to non-burn levels for about 6 years (Dyrness ). Water repellency and its persistence are affect-ed by differences in soil moisture, soil texture, se-verity of the fire, and quantity and composition of.

      Malvar, M. C. et al. Short-term effects of post-fire salvage logging on runoff and soil erosion. For. Ecol. Kishchuk, B. E. et al. Decadal soil and stand response to fire. Soil moisture and groundwater show net positive storage of water from September through January, totaling 36 cm/y ( million ac-ft). In addition, springs sourcing from the High Cascades aquifer contribute significant discharge to the headwaters of some sub-basins such as the McKenzie.


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Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon by C. T. Dyrness Download PDF EPUB FB2

Dyrness, C. Theodore. Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the High Cascades of Oregon. Research Paper PNW Portland, OR: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 18 p. Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon.

Portland, Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon by Dyrness, C. cn ; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.). Publisher: Portland, Or.: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest forest and Range Experiment Station,Author: C. Dyrness. Oregon, soil wettability resulting from a late. High Cascades of Oregon. Res. Paper PNW USDA For. The high post-fire values indicate the fire's devastating effects on vegetation loss Author: Peter Robichaud.

The extent of a wildfire’s impact on the soil biome depends on how hot the fire burns; a quick burn that sweeps across taking out the surface vegetation won’t result in significant heating of the soil, but many wildfires burn very intensely and can increase the temperature of the surface soil to degrees Celsius or even higher.

Dryness C () Effects of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon. USDA for. Ser. Res. Paper PNW Ebel BA, Moody JA () Synthesis of soil-hydraulic properties and infiltration timescales in wildfire-affected soils.

Reduced soil wettability and infiltration after wildfire have been observed elsewhere in the Oregon Cascades (Dyrness, ). Evapotranspiration losses from the forested area during a relatively dry spring in (Fig.

2) probably caused subsoil moisture to be lower than that in. Effects of fire on certain physical properties of selected chaparral soils. Symp. Din. Mgmt Med. Ecosyst.DYRNESS C.T. & YOUNGBERG C.T. The effect of logging and slash burning on soil structure.

Soil Sci, Soc. Proc. 21, DYRNESS C.T. Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon. 1. Introduction.

Fire-induced soil water repellency (hydrophobicity) is commonly viewed as one of the main causes of the substantial increases in hillslope runoff and erosion observed following wildfire (e.g. Sartz,Swanson,Morris and Moses,Scott and Van Wyk,Shakesby et al., in press, Shakesby et al.,Andreu et al.,Inbar et al.,Robichaud and Brown.

We altered DHSVM to model the effects of post‐fire vegetation and soil disturbances. [4] As in work by Agee [], we defined three fire regime categories. Low severity fire regimes are typical of the lower elevation eastern Cascade forests; fires occur fairly frequently but.

The Cascade Range or Cascades is a major mountain range of western North America, extending from southern British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to Northern includes both non-volcanic mountains, such as the North Cascades, and the notable volcanoes known as the High small part of the range in British Columbia is referred to as the Canadian Cascades or.

The effect of addition of a wettable biochar on soil water repellency by: Peter, Douglas, et al. Published: () Organic matter and wettability characteristics of wildfire ash from Mediterranean conifer forests by: Stefan, Doerr Published: (). Dyrness CT () Effects of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon.

In: USDA forest service research paper PNW Francos M, Pereira P, Alcañiz M, Mataix-Solera J, Úbeda X (a) Impact of an intense rainfall event on soil properties following a wildfire in a Mediterranean environment (North–East Spain).

Fire-induced or enhanced soil water repellency is often viewed as a key cause of the substantial increases in runoff and erosion following severe wildfires. In this study, the effects of different fire severities on soil water repellency are examined in eucalypt forest catchments in the Sandstone Tablelands near Sydney, burnt in and PDF | Intense rainfall events in the Mediterranean environment after severe wildfires can have an impact on soil water repellency.

This study seeks to | Find, read and cite all the research you. Nutrient levels and soil organic matter both increase after fire.

Spanish research showed a significant increase in soil pH, carbon and nutrients immediately after a prescribed grass fire.

A year later, pH and total carbon had returned to pre-fire levels, nitrogen and phosphorus werea bove pre-fire levels, but potassium was lower. Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the high Cascades of Oregon - by Dyrness, C. cn; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.) texts.

The effect of wildfire on soil is typically tied to the amount of heat transferred into the ground during a fire. This does not necessarily mean that high-intensity fires will have the greatest impact on the soil.

In some cases, high-intensity fires can move quickly through the tree canopies and have less impact on the soil than low-intensity. Wildfires may produce several changes in the short- and longterm in the landscape and in the soil system.

The magnitude of these changes induced by fire in the components of ecosystems (water, soil, vegetation and fauna) depends on fire properties (fire intensity and severity) and environmental factors (vegetation, soil, geomorphology, etc.).

To determine the relationship between fire severity and tree seedling establishment, we investigated landscape pattern and composition, fire history, and tree seedling establishment on recent natural burns in Shasta red fire (Abies magnifica var.

shastensis) forests of Crater Lake National Park in the southern Oregon Cascade Range. Fire.Dyrness CT () Effect of wildfire on soil wettability in the High Cascades of Oregon.

USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experimental Station. The impact of wildfire on soil erodibility is supposed to operate through its effect on soil organic matter and, thus, to depend strongly on fire severity. Soil erodibility is then little affected by low‐severity wildfires but markedly diminished following high‐severity wildfires.